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« links for 2007-10-01 | Main | Online content can only be free? This French guy disagrees »

October 02, 2007

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Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Ian Pearson's trip to the future:

» BT futurologist on new needs hierarchy and feminisation of work from Putting people first
BTs futurologist Ian Pearson sets out some interesting ideas on the future at a recent conference in Rome, as reported by Bruno Giussani. He suggests a different reading of Maslows hierarchy of needs , saying that the value is now in ... [Read More]

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I usually look to Ian Pearson for some provocative technology pronouncements but the sociology of inverting Maslow's triangle has been around for many years. My blog ref:
http://ic-pod.typepad.com/design_at_the_edge/2007/07/iphone---boxi-1.html
links to some of the latest thoughts, which I believe will enrich discussion in this area... after all... William Gibson said "The future is already here. It's just unevenly distributed."

Gibson's comment is, I think, truly on the money - and actually many of the innovation listed have probably never truly made it to "mass market", i.e. beyond the innovator and early adopter groups which make up about 15% of the population. In the western developped world, max. cumulative shipments of walkman have reached 200 M, ie penetration has been probably between 10%-15% of the western population. So how about PDA or Playstations ?! The point is not to deny that these innovations have become importants $ markets - but that on a sociological point of view, to paraphrase Gibson, innovation adoption are truly massively unevenly distributed..

... and as to the point of duality and the fake orgasms - well, I will digress on the subject, but I would agree that in a future not so far out, the exponential power of automated calculation may generate at some "singular" point phenomenal simulation power which will create a new, not-so-smart but super efficient way to crack problems - any kind of problems. But to imagine a replacement of our current world ?... well, dreams, even electronic ones, dont permit to feed or to reproduce ourselves: these are two critical needs that still must be met - otherwise there might be no more dreamers to live the electronic dreams. And since reproduction is about competition for males and male selection for females, I guess you can put any inverse maslow pyramid you want, any new toys or possibilities around, this all will be but a detour to finally go back to square 1 of the life invented by millions of years of natural selection. So Peterson might be right in the details of his vision - but it's really just an exciting teaser about new forms of escapist entertainment, not about a brave new world.

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